Oracle Database, also stylized as OracleDB, is built as a relational database management system (RDBMS), developed over 30 years ago by Lawrence Ellison. Even up to date, it’s one of the most used and trusted relational database engines. Through the Oracle Database, users can directly access data objects or an application front end by using SQL. 

The Oracle Database architecture is 100% scalable, being widely used by international enterprises that manage and process data through wide and local area networks. Actually, the Oracle and SQL structures are quite similar, which is an advantage for programmers that learn database administration.

Based on a company’s budget and requirements, there are numerous Oracle Database versions, as follows:

– Oracle Lite, which works on mobile devices;

– Express Edition, also stylized as XE, which is a light, limited and free Windows and Linux edition;

– Standard Edition, which enables basic functionalities for users that don’t need the full Enterprise Edition Package;

– Enterprise Edition, which is the full-featured version, offering maximum security and performances. 

One of the most significant characteristics of the Oracle Database is the fact that it splits the logical and physical parts. This makes the data location irrelevant and transparent for users, in case of large-scale distributed (or grid) computing. Therefore, a more modular physical structure is enabled, which can be completed and changed without affecting the database’s activity, data or users.

Sharing resources this way enables a very flexible data network, with a capacity that can be easily adjusted in order to suit demand, with no degradation of the service.